Clare

2019-12-08T21:52:36+00:00

when i came across buddhism again in my early thirties i felt it was intellectually stimulating and the practices was deeply satisfying.

David

2019-12-08T20:27:11+00:00

When were you first exposed to dharma? The show Kung Fu at about age 11. I recall watching the meditation and wanting the peace it showed. It was of great use when parents used to argue and Dad active alcoholic violence. Seated on the bed in my room in basic position, I would meditate through the violence. Catholic priest taught to obey without reason no matter what. This never sat well with. Looking back I have been Buddhist [...]

Michael

2019-12-08T05:27:11+00:00

“No sessions, no breaks.” This is a saying in the Vajrayana Buddhist tradition that seems to be the theme for my spiritual journey. I remember talking to ‘God’ when I was three years old. This was the language I heard around me, echoing from all natural phenomena and relationships. I knew it was about being present to the moment and connecting with something beyond my limited self. I spent a lot of time inside my introverted nature discussing [...]

Phyllis

2019-12-05T17:45:25+00:00

When were you first exposed to dharma? The short simple answer is that I had an experience when I was 5, that I didn’t understand until I began practicing the Buddhist path. I felt that these practices chose me, they landed in my lap. The details: I was first introduced to Eastern philosophy when I was about 15. At 16 I read Hesse’s book, “Siddhartha”, and thought, “Ok, I’m the Buddha!” I began to explore yoga at that age, [...]

Indigo

2019-12-05T04:21:52+00:00

I was more connected to the teacher than the teaching at first. I had a vision of a teacher, in the way you generate a visualization of a deity during some Vajrayana practices, while the lines of “Crying to the Guru from afar” started playing in my head. I had only ever read the text once, so was quite surprised to learn that I had memorized it.

Zannette

2019-07-25T05:21:57+00:00

My first year of high school I attended an independent Episcopalian school that required us to take a course teaching “world history” and “world literature” as seen through the lens of the religious traditions of the world. The course was constructed explicitly as a rite of passage, and the challenges were so intense that every one of us was transformed by the experience.

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