Advancing on the path

As one progresses further on the path, the potential for transformation expands both in nature and acceleration. While the practice may yield personal benefits, the essence of the Buddhist path transcends individual achievements. Deepening the practice extends into various aspects of life, from personal relationships to its integration into our professional endeavors. Whether through annual commitments to retreats or establishing a more ‘formal’ relationship with a teacher, the exploration of options offers diverse ways to hasten the transformation process. Recognizing the preciousness of human life and the finite nature of time, employing skillful means to accelerate our transformation for the benefit of others becomes the cornerstone of a robust Buddhist practice.

Deepening

In contemporary times, the entry point into Buddhism has become remarkably diverse compared to its initial introduction to the West. While the intellectual allure of Buddhism has attracted many armchair enthusiasts, the true power of Buddhism lies in its practice. Taking refuge in the three jewels of Buddhism doesn’t necessitate exclusivity from other traditions. However, it’s through deeper exploration that the richness of the practice unfolds.  

Learn how people deepen their practice

Other Practices

The depth of Buddhist practices surpasses mere meditation, encompassing a spectrum of activities from chanting to visualization. This diverse range of practices serves as a means to cultivate the qualities of wisdom and compassion, offering varied approaches tailored to the unique needs and preferences of individuals.

Learn about the diversity of other practices

Integration 

The proof of the practice extends beyond mere peace or intellectual realizations; it manifests in the way it is embodied in our daily experiences. Whether it’s the routine task of washing dishes or seamlessly integrating the practice into the professional workplace, its vitality becomes evident in our interactions with others. The essence of the practice comes to life in the nuanced and practical application within the fabric of our everyday lives.

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Relationships

With the central tenet of nurturing wisdom and compassion within ourselves to benefit all others, it’s evident that the transformation of practitioners’ relationships takes center stage. As our spiritual maturity evolves, the quality of our relationships becomes a reflective mirror to that maturity.

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The role of the teacher remains a highly debated subject in Western Buddhism. The influence of power structures and capitalist motivations has understandably led to a diminished perception of this role. However, it remains a topic worthy of exploration, particularly when contemplating the pace of our spiritual maturation and navigating the subtleties of the ego within the context of spiritual practice. Hear from teacher's view. Role of Teachers Hear from student's perspectives. GARETH Amber Grace

Personal Adversity 

In addition to influencing our interpersonal relationships, the potency of teachings and practice manifests in how we navigate personal adversity. Whether grappling with addictions or facing the challenges of cancer, the transformative impact of the practice on such intense forms of suffering becomes a testament to our spiritual maturity.

Learn about how people manage personal adversities

Role of Teachers

The role of the teacher remains a highly debated subject in Western Buddhism. The influence of power structures and capitalist motivations has understandably led to a diminished perception of this role. However, it remains a topic worthy of exploration, particularly when contemplating the pace of our spiritual maturation and navigating the subtleties of the ego within the context of spiritual practice.

Learn about their role from the student’s perspective or what they have to say on the subject. 

Fruit of Practice

Profound transformations in lay practitioners may not always be overtly witnessed or discussed, yet they undeniably exist. Many individuals, while remaining modest about their spiritual maturity, occasionally reveal the depth of their transformation through the quiet confidence they exude.

Learn about what spiritual maturity may look like

Worldview

How does Buddhist philosophy and practices support the global challenges that we are facing ? From political polarization to climate change, understanding the nature of phenomena and having a sustainable personal response to these global challenges can make the difference between apathy and healthy engagement.

Learn how global issues are framed.  

While perpetually challenging within the constraints of a modern lifestyle marked by insufficient time and resources, the concept of a retreat as a vessel to deepen one’s practice remains a cornerstone of Buddhist philosophy. The opportunity to delve into the profound realms of study and meditation that a retreat affords serves as a tangible and experiential return on investment for one’s spiritual practice. Read, watch and see the visuals Retreats Watch the highlights Jogen Mark Jackie

Retreats

While perpetually challenging within the constraints of a modern lifestyle marked by insufficient time and resources, the concept of a retreat as a vessel to deepen one’s practice remains a cornerstone of Buddhist philosophy. The opportunity to delve into the profound realms of study and meditation that a retreat affords serves as a tangible and experiential return on investment for one’s spiritual practice.

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Death and Reincarnation 

While not the most popular topic for contemplation, death and reincarnation are integral parts of the Buddhist canon. How practitioners navigate and engage with these subjects as part of their practice becomes a bridge that we all must cross. For many, discussing these matters within the context of the relative material world suffices. However, for others, delving into these subjects can represent the final and ultimate expression of their practice.

Learn about this important subject

Enlightenment

The concept of enlightenment in Buddhism often faces challenges in translation, especially in the context of the modern landscape. Frequently, contemporary terminology used by some teachers refers to true liberation in both the relative and ultimate senses. How practitioners engage with and grapple with this concept becomes a pivotal part of their journey, offering a glimpse into the profound possibilities that unfold within the realm of enlightenment.

Learn about the possibility

Practitioners with over 15 years of experience

2024-02-21T23:13:07+00:00

Cynthia

But he looked at me and he said, You look so happy. He said, What happened? I’ve tried all my life to make you happy. You look so happy. What happened? I said, I have never felt so peaceful and happy and content in my entire life and it’s not a result of anything outside of me. It’s a result of of working deeply within myself and meditating.

2023-12-03T16:38:57+00:00

Jackie

And so it’s fit well with my traditional, the way I had been before I found Buddhism, which was as an agnostic or atheist. So this there wasn’t any conflict between those different philosophies of life. The other part of Buddhism that I was extremely attracted to is that it was besides the fact that it gave you a pathway, a curriculum, it was very laid out to achieve this wisdom and this peace that comes from that.

2024-03-07T16:26:57+00:00

Christopher

So my my spiritual journey, I started the Salt Lake Buddhist Fellowship about almost nine years ago after reading a book called River of Fire River of Water. And it was interesting because I had picked up the book off of the used bookshelf many times before. It had put it down, put it down, put it down. And then one day it just picked it up and read it. And it was pretty transformative, even though I didn’t I even though I didn’t buy everything in the book, like hook, line and sinker and like, Oh, this is Nirvana and this is what I wanted.

2023-12-29T16:38:18+00:00

Grace

Grace, a native of Toronto, Canada, was born into a unique blend of religious backgrounds – her father a devoted Won Buddhist and her mother, a hybrid of Won Buddhism and Presbyterianism. Raised amidst the teachings of Won Buddhism, Grace's exposure to its practices deepened during family trips to Korea. Although she initially attended the temple due to her parents, her true connection to the faith emerged during her university years.

2023-12-29T16:29:03+00:00

Geshe Denma

Geshe Denma Gyaltsen was born in the Dolpo region of northern Nepal. In 1981 his father brought him to Menri Monastery in India, regarded as the most important Bön monastery, to begin his program of study toward the Geshe degree.

2023-12-13T22:29:08+00:00

Phyllis

I was first introduced to Eastern philosophy when I was about 15. At 16 I read Hesse’s book, “Siddhartha”, and thought, “Ok, I’m the Buddha!” I began to explore yoga at that age, and it was a time of many eastern ways of being introduced into our culture.

2023-12-14T16:22:20+00:00

Rachel

My first exposure to dharma was during my undergraduate studies majoring in Philosophy/Asian Studies. However, this didn’t translate to a personal practice until a few years later when I lost two friends to suicide in a six-month period. The bereavement related to their deaths was so overwhelming that it forced me to seek out additional community and support.

2023-12-29T16:29:21+00:00

Ani Lodro

And then at a certain point in around 30 years old, you know, I just was extremely unhappy and it seemed like I shouldn't be because I had, you know, done all the schooling and then gotten these good jobs and then was, you know, making money, which was supposed to be a really important thing, you know, in acquiring the assets. And and I was looking at my life and it just dawned on me that, Wow, you know what? I have all these things and I am actually very empty inside. I don't feel fulfilled.

2023-12-29T16:03:28+00:00

Jung

January 2004. I participated in my first 10 day Vipassana retreat as taught by SN Goenka. It was a profound experience for me. I re-lived deep-seated memories and the emotions that came with them and started the process of shedding old traumas, dramas, and attachments to suffering.